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Roger Federer Rewrites History For The 14th Time

June 8, 2009

Roger-Federer-French-Open-final-2009-trophy_2315278

There is no other way to say this: Roger Federer conquers Paris!

It was a bittersweet victory for the Swiss Maestro to capture the lone title that has eluded him for three years. Lucky for him, the King of Clay Rafael Nadal wasn’t at the other side of the net. Of all possibilities, Robin Soderling was Federer’s surprise opponent in the final. Contrastingly, it was Soderling who dethroned Nadal and sent him packing exactly a week ago. Prior to this grand slam tournament, Soderling has yet to get past the 3rd round. So it was Robin’s biggest career achievemnt so far. This year’s final, at the red clay courts of Roland Garros, showcased the genius of Roger Federer. Clearly, Robin Soderling wasn’t equipped with the right weapons and enough ammunition to overpower Federer’s devastating forehand and precise drop shots. The match was a definitive tennis lesson for Robin Soderling. In the end, Roger completed the rout in straight sets just under the 2-hour mark. Hats off to him.

What’s more compelling about Federer’s accomplishment is how he challenged history once again. His triumph at the French Open is one for the record books. Find out why after the jump Duke!

Game. Set. Match. Federer.

Roger Federer finally won his maiden French Open title with a straight-sets victory over Robin Soderling.
The Swiss claimed a 6-1 7-6 (7-1) 6-4 success at Roland Garros to complete a career Grand Slam and move level with Pete Sampras on 14 major titles.
The 27-year-old joined Fred Perry, Don Budge, Roy Emerson, Rod Laver and Andre Agassi as the only men to have won all four Grand Slam events.
He collapsed to his knees on the Paris clay and began to cry after clinching the one major title to have previously eluded him, having lost each of the last three finals to Rafael Nadal.
Federer had raced through the opening set in 23 minutes, losing just one point on his own serve, as his Swedish opponent initially appeared overawed by the occasion.
But 23rd seed Soderling, who beat Nadal, Nikolay Davydenko and Fernando Gonzalez en route to the final, improved thereafter.
Intruder
The second set remained on serve and, as light rain began to fall in Paris, a dramatic incident at the start of the fourth game briefly held up play.
An intruder leapt on court and brandished a flag in Federer’s face before attempting to put a cap on his head. As security came on court, the man turned around, leapt over the net before being rugby-tackled.
Federer appeared slightly shaken by the incident at first and lost the next game to love, although it was on Soderling’s serve.
The next three games went with serve as the rain continued to come down steadily and the match supervisor was huddled court-side, appearing ready to stop play.
Soderling twice kept his composure when serving to stay in the set and took it to a tie-break. By now umbrellas were up everywhere in the crowd.
Tie-break
Federer opened a 4-1 lead in the tie-break with three consecutive aces, moving to set point with a superb drop shot and then sent down a fourth ace to clinch the set.
He immediately took control of the third set by breaking Soderling’s serve in the opening game.
And Federer remained resolute on his own delivery until, serving for the match at 5-4 ahead, he fell 30-40 behind.
But a confident volley forced deuce, and Federer closed out victory in one hour and 55 minutes on his first match point when Soderling netted a service return.

roland-garros

Roger Federer finally won his maiden French Open title with a straight-sets victory over Robin Soderling. The Swiss claimed a 6-1 7-6 (7-1) 6-4 success at Roland Garros to complete a career Grand Slam and move level with Pete Sampras on 14 major titles.

The 27-year-old joined Fred Perry, Don Budge, Roy Emerson, Rod Laver and Andre Agassi as the only men to have won all four Grand Slam events. He collapsed to his knees on the Paris clay and began to cry after clinching the one major title to have previously eluded him, having lost each of the last three finals to Rafael Nadal.

Federer had raced through the opening set in 23 minutes, losing just one point on his own serve, as his Swedish opponent initially appeared overawed by the occasion.

But 23rd seed Soderling, who beat Nadal, Nikolay Davydenko and Fernando Gonzalez en route to the final, improved thereafter.

Roger-Federer-Robin-Soderling-French-Open-fin_2315215

The second set remained on serve and, as light rain began to fall in Paris, a dramatic incident at the start of the fourth game briefly held up play.

An intruder leapt on court and brandished a flag in Federer’s face before attempting to put a cap on his head. As security came on court, the man turned around, leapt over the net before being rugby-tackled.

Federer appeared slightly shaken by the incident at first and lost the next game to love, although it was on Soderling’s serve.

The next three games went with serve as the rain continued to come down steadily and the match supervisor was huddled court-side, appearing ready to stop play.

Soderling twice kept his composure when serving to stay in the set and took it to a tie-break. By now umbrellas were up everywhere in the crowd.

Federer opened a 4-1 lead in the tie-break with three consecutive aces, moving to set point with a superb drop shot and then sent down a fourth ace to clinch the set.

He immediately took control of the third set by breaking Soderling’s serve in the opening game.

And Federer remained resolute on his own delivery until, serving for the match at 5-4 ahead, he fell 30-40 behind.

But a confident volley forced deuce, and Federer closed out victory in one hour and 55 minutes on his first match point when Soderling netted a service return.

Roger-Federer-French-Open-final-2009-serves_2315276

Source: Skysports


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